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Creating the future: The next generation of directed self-assembly

Semiconductors created from silicon make the magic of modern electronics possible by creating a platform for the complex processes that allow engineers to fabricate a staggering number of transistors on microchips. Advances in microprocessor technology have largely relied on the ability to make smaller and smaller transistors. Directed self-assembly (DSA) is a chemistry-based patterning process that holds the promise of allowing lithographers to create even smaller features by playing on the natural propensity of block copolymers to self-assemble and align.

Topics: Directed Self-Assembly, DSA

DSA: How far we've come and how much farther is left to go

To the average consumer, the path of new technology looks pretty linear. A cool new concept emerges, scientists figure out how to manufacture it, and pretty soon consumers can find it in a product.

Topics: EUV, Directed Self-Assembly, DSA, SEMICON Taiwan, Gartner Hype Scale

Finding Nano: Where Will DSA Lead Us Next?

In its constant quest to innovate, Brewer Science is continually on the cutting edge of what is next. We are currently combining directed self-assembly (DSA) and lithography to achieve sub–10 nm nanostructures. DSA uses block copolymers to generate arrays of self-assembled shapes such as lines or cylinders; the spatial arrangements of the resulting features can build complex structures for use in products such as cell phones and computer hard drives.

Topics: lithography, Directed Self-Assembly, DSA, Arkema, Nanotechnology

Directed Self-Assembly: From the Top-Down to the Bottom-Up

In previous posts, we’ve made references to Moore’s law and how, with uncanny accuracy, it has predicted that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit (IC) would double approximately every two years. The semiconductor industry has tirelessly chased Moore's law ever since it was first coined in the 1970s, but as ICs have become smaller and smaller, traditional lithography processes have made it more and more difficult to keep up.

Topics: Integrated Circuits, Directed Self-Assembly, DSA

Futuristic Approach with Directed Self-Assembly

Now that Brewer Science is leading the charge in improving directed self-assembly (DSA) technology, products such as semiconductors, computer hard drives, and drug therapies can benefit from new manufacturing methods that can make complex structures as small as 7 nanometers. The technology allows for higher product volumes and lower costs than in the past, all without requiring manufacturing equipment upgrades. What’s next for DSA technology across the world? We asked the opinion of Dr. Marya Lieberman, associate professor of chemistry at the University of Notre Dame. Lieberman’s research focuses on nanostructures made from DNA as self-assembling "circuit boards" for nanoelectronic and nanomagnetic devices.

Topics: Directed Self-Assembly, DSA, semiconductors, nano technologies